We use cookies to help this site deliver the best possible experience.   Remove this notice.

Sesame filled Rice Balls- Tang Yuan Recipe

Ingredients for people


    For the filling
  • Black sesame seeds : 20 g
  • Caster sugar : 30 g
  • Coconut oil : 30 ml

    For the batter
  • Glutinous rice flour : 230 g
  • Tapioca flour : 25 g
  • Water : 230 ml

    For the stock
  • Demerara sugar : 45 g
  • Tapioca flour : 30 g
  • Water : 500 ml
Method
  • 1For the filling

    Grind the sesame seeds in a Mortar and pestle, add the caster sugar and the coconut oil and mix to obtain a dry paste.
    Knead together and roll into 18 little balls.

  • 2For the batter

    Place the rice flour,and tapioca flour in a large bowl and mix well.
    Pour in the water and bring together with a spoon until the dough can be turned onto a table and kneaded.
    The dough should resemble a glossy firm malleable dough, not crumbly, almost like 'icing ' in texture.

    Adjust accordingly with a splash of water or more rice flour to achieve the right texture.

    Roll into a sausage, cut in half, and divide into 18 even sized pieces.

    Roll each piece into a smooth ball,and, while holding the ball in the palm of one hand, indent the middle with your thumb. Place the ball of filling in the centre, and pull over the edges to encapsulate it.If you find when indenting the dough that the outer edges crack, lightly wet the palm of your hand and this will help moisten the mix and meld the edges together.

    Roll gently to achieve a nice smooth ball, and roll in the spare tapioca flour to prevent it sticking.

  • 3For the stock

    Add the demerera sugar to a large pan with the water and bring to the boil.

    Carefully lower the balls into the pot on a slotted spoon as they will stick to the bottom easily.
    Bring back up to the boil and simmer gently for approximately 10 minutes, the Tang yuan will float on the surface when ready.

    Serve in a bowl with a spoon of the poaching liquor over the top.

Chef's tip

«Try adding food colouring to the dough for added effect. Vary the fillings or add ginger or spices to the poaching liquor to change the flavour.»

A delicious Chinese dessert, traditionally eaten in the Lantern festival, but also popular at New years eve, as the roundness symbolises togetherness and reunion

Rate this recipe :

(0 vote)

  • Preparation  15mins
  • Cooking time  15mins
  • Rest time  0h

·